Daily Archives: April 10, 2014

The future of ‘authenticity’

I recently watched an interesting documentary on the evolution of the British coffee shop market. I then had an idea for a new chain that is so sharp it would scratch your display if I wrote it here, so I’ll keep that secret. The documentary left me with another thought: what’s so special about authentic?

I’ll blog as I think and see where I get to, if anywhere.

Starbucks and Costa sell coffee (for my American readers, Costa is a British version of Starbucks that sells better coffee but seems to agree they should pay tax just like the rest of us – yes I know Starbucks has since reformed a bit, but Costa didn’t have to). Cafe Nero (or is it just Nero?) sells coffee with the ‘Authentic Italian’ experience. I never knew that until I watched the documentary. Such things fly way over my head. If Nero is closest when I want a coffee, I’ll go in, and I know the coffee is nice, just like Costa is nice, but authentic Italian? Why the hell would I care about my coffee being authentic Italian? I don’t go anywhere to get an authentic Danish pastry or an authentic Australian beer, or an authentic Swiss cheese, or an authentic Coke. What has coffee got to do with Italy anyway? It’s a drink. I don’t care how they treat it in any particular country, even if they used to make it nicer there. The basic recipes and techniques for making a decent coffee were spread worldwide decades ago, and it’s the coffee I want. Anyway, we use a Swiss coffee machine with Swiss coffee at home, not Italian, because the Swiss learned from their Italian sub-population and then added their usual high precision materials and engineering and science, they didn’t just take it as gospel that Mama somehow knew best. And because my wife is Swiss. My razor sharp idea isn’t a Swiss coffee chain by the way.

I therefore wonder how many other people who go into Cafe Nero care tuppence whether they are getting an authentic Italian experience, or whether like me they just want a decent coffee and it seems a nice enough place. I can understand the need to get the best atmosphere, ambiance, feel, whatever you want to call it. I can certainly understand that people might want a cake or snack to go with their coffee. I just don’t understand the desire to associate with another country. Italy is fine for a visit; I have nothing against Italians, but neither do I aspire in any way to be or behave Italian.

Let’s think it through a bit. An overall experience is made up of a large number of components: quality and taste of the coffee and snacks, natural or synthetic, healthy or naughty, the staff and the nature of the service, exterior and interior decor and color scheme, mixture of aromas, range of foods, size of cake portion, ages groups and tribal ranges of other customers, comfort of furnishings, lighting levels, wireless LAN access….. There are hundreds of factors. The potential range of combinations  is massive. People can’t handle all that information when they want a coffee, so they need an easy way to decide quickly. ‘Italian’ is really just a brand, reducing the choice stress and Cafe Nero is just adopting a set of typical brand values evolved by an entire nation over centuries. I guess that makes some sense.

But not all that much sense. The Italian bit is a nice shortcut, but once it’s taken out of Italy, whatever it might be, it isn’t in Italy any more. The customers are not expected to order in Italian apart beyond a few silly words to describe the size of the coffee. The customers mostly aren’t Italian, don’t look Italian, don’t chat in Italian and don’t behave Italian. The weather isn’t Italian. The views outside aren’t Italian. The architecture isn’t Italian. So only a few bits of the overall experience can be Italian, the overall experience just isn’t. If only a few bits are authentic, why bother? Why not just extract some insights of what things about ‘Italian’ customers find desirable and then adapt them to the local market? Perhaps what they have done, so if they just drop the pretense, everything would be fine. They can’t honestly say they offer an authentic Italian experience, just a few components of such. I never noticed their supposed Italianness anyway but I hate pretentiousness so now that I understand their offering, it adds up to a slight negative for me. Now that I know they are pretending to be Italian, I will think twice before using them again, but still will if it’s more than a few metres further to another coffee shop. Really, I just want a coffee and possibly a slice of cake, in a reasonably warm and welcoming coffee shop.

Given that it is impossible to provide an ‘authentic Italian experience’ outside of Italy without also simulating every aspect of being in Italy, how authentic could they be in the future? What is the future of authenticity? Could Cafe Nero offer a genuinely Italian experience if that’s what they really wanted? Bring on VR, AR, direct brain links, sensory recording and replay. Total Recall.  Yes they could, sort of. With a full sensory full immersion system, you could deliver an experience that is real and authentic in every sense except that it isn’t real. In 2050, you could sell a seemingly genuinely authentic Italian coffee and cake in a genuinely Italian atmosphere, anywhere. But when they do that, I’ll download that onto my home coffee machine or my digital jewelry. Come to think about it, I could just drink water and eat bread and do all the rest virtually. Full authenticity, zero cost.

This Total Recall style virtual holiday or virtual coffee is fine as far as it goes, but a key problem is knowing that it isn’t real. If you disable that by hypnosis or drugs or surgery or implants or Zombie tech, then your Matrix style world will have some other issues to worry about that are more important. If you don’t, and I’m pretty sure we won’t, then knowing the difference between real and virtual will be all-important. If you know it isn’t real, it pushes a different set of buttons in your brain.

In parallel, as AI gets more and more powerful, a lot of things will be taken over by machines. That adds to the total work pool of man + machine so the economy expands and we’re all better off, if we do it right. We can even restore and improve the environment at the same time. In that world, some roles will still be occupied by humans. People will focus more on human skills, human interaction, crafts, experiences, care, arts and entertainment, sports, and especially offering love and attention. I call it the Care Economy. If you take two absolutely identical items, one provided by a machine and one by another person, the one offered by the person will be more valued, and therefore more valuable – apart from a tiny geek market that specifically wants machines. Don’t believe me? Think of the high price glassware you keep for special occasions and dinner parties. Cut by hand by an expert with years of training. Each glass is slightly different from every other. In one sense it is shoddy workmanship compared to the mass-produced glass, precision made, all identical, that costs 1% as much. The human involvement is absolutely critical. The key human involvement is that you know you couldn’t possibly do it, that it took a highly skilled craftsman. You aren’t buying just the glass, but the skills and attention and dedication and time of the craftsman. In just the same way, you will happily pay a bigger proportion of your bigger future income for other people’s time. Virtual is fine and cheap, but you’ll happily pay far more for the real thing. That will greatly offset the forces pushing towards a totally virtual experience.

This won’t happen overnight, and that brings us to another force that plays out over the same time. When we use a phrase like ‘authentic Italian’, we don’t normally put a date on it. Do we mean contemporary Italy, 1960 Italy, or what? If 1960, then we’d have to use a lot of virtual tech to simulate it. If we mean contemporary, then that includes all the virtual stuff that goes on in Italy too, which is likely pretty much what happens virtually elsewhere. A large proportion of our everyday will be virtual. How can you have authentic virtual? When half of what everyone sees every day isn’t real, you could no more have an authentic Italian coffee bar than an authentic hobbit hole in Middle Earth.

Authenticity is a term that can already only be applied to a subset of properties of a particular component. A food item or a drink could be authentic in terms of its recipe and taste, origin and means of production of the ingredients, perhaps even served by an Italian, but the authenticity of the surrounding context is doomed to be more and more limited. Does it matter though? I don’t think so.

The more I think about it, the less I care if it is in any way authentic. I want a pleasing product served by pleasant human staff in a pleasant atmosphere. I care about the various properties and attributes in an absolute sense, and I also care whether they are provided by human or machine, but the degree to which they mimic some particular tradition really doesn’t add any value for me. I am very happy to set culture free to explore the infinite potential of imagination and make an experience as enjoyable as possible.  Authenticity is just a labelled cage, and we’re better if it is unlocked. I want real pleasure, not pretend pleasure, but authenticity is increasingly becoming a pretense.

Oh, my razor sharp idea? As I said, it’s secret.

 

 

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Heartbleed: a personal action plan

There is much panic today after the Heartbleed bug has been announced. All those nice sites with the padlock symbol running https where you felt safe and warm, well it turns out that some of them may have not been so safe and warm after all. Some were, but many IT advisors are recommending you change all your passwords to be safe because we don’t know for sure what was compromised.

BUT DON’T CHANGE THEM ALL YET!!

Right at the moment, a lot of sites won’t have installed the patches to fix the bug, so are still vulnerable, and you really don’t want to be typing in a new password that is being intercepted, do you?

I am not an IT advisor, but I have managed to get through 33 years of computing all day every day with only 2 viruses so far, and one of those came on the system disks with my first ever Mac in 1987 – yes really. I think my approach is fairly common sense and not too over the top.

There is a natural common sense order in which you need to do stuff. It will take you ages, so my advice is to wait a couple of days. The bug has been there a long time, so a couple days more won’t increase your risk much, but if you change everything this morning you might have to do it all over again in a few days time. If it makes you feel safer, do Step 2 now and then change your Google and Yahoo passwords

When you do:

Step 1

First, limit the amount you use the web or internet for the next day or two so that you are compromised as little as possible, as few passwords are intercepted and cookies read and password files stolen as possible.

Step 2

Meanwhile, clean your PC up a bit. Some of you will be bang up to date and will have different set of favorite tools than me, in which case, do it your way, but make sure you do it. If you are not quite so IT savvy, try my list:

Run C-Cleaner. If you don”t have it, get the free version from

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download

(Advanced System Care works fine too, but in my experience you need to be extremely careful installing it to avoid getting other dross on your machine. Don’t just click next without reading what boxes are checked/unchecked and what other downloads you’re authorising. I have both but really, either works fine alone)

Basically, tick all the boxes for all the browsers to clear out all your cookies and any junk that may have been stored in your temporary files. Then do a registry clean. It isn’t related to this problem but it is good practice anyway.

Your memory, wastebasket, temporary files, and other places that can be scanned using the heartbleed bug are now clean. I recently tried using Superantispyware too, which is fine, but so far it hasn’t found anything if I have already run C Cleaner.

Now, when you do use the web before it is all patched, you’ll at least be at lower risk.

Step 3

DON’T PANIC!!!!

HT Douglas Adams.

The world probably won’t collapse before the weekend and all the competent companies will have their IT staff patching up and writing you nice emails or welcome screens to say how much they love you and protect you and that they are now ready for your new password. Well, wait a while. They may be ready, but if your browser isn’t yet ready, and especially if you’re saving your passwords using the browser, then your new password could be intercepted.

Think about it. If you are being intercepted, changing the password won’t work, the new one will be caught, so you’ll have to do it all again. If you aren’t, then you won’t know, so will still have to do it again just in case. Google and Yahoo say you don’t have to worry about their sites, and they are probably telling the truth, but I among many am not 100% convinced, and I will be changing my Google and Yahoo stuff. Soon, but not yet.

Use the time to make a list of any sites you remember visiting that have passwords, especially any with other personal details or credit card or bank details.

Step 4

On Saturday, Sunday or Monday, reserve a long session to fix your life. Make a big coffee and set yourself down for a long session.

4.1 Run system update to make sure your system is up to date with the latest fixes.

4.2 Do Step 2 again to make sure your PC is once again clean.

4.3 A full system scan for viruses and other malware wouldn’t hurt.

4.3 Reboot just for peace of mind. You will be changing everything, you want to feel you did it right.

4.4 Think up some sort of password scheme that is different from the one you used before. Use combinations of things, first letters of items or people on a list, keyboard patterns, numbers that mean something. It’s notoriously easy to guess a birth-date or a pet’s name, but hard to crack a combination of bits of several things. Everyone agrees you should use a different one for every site, but we all know you won’t. At least if you use the same root, change a leaf or two by including a letter or two from the site name, maybe shifted two letters along the alphabet or whatever. Even that helps. Be inventive.

4.5 If you use a master password file on your computer, empty it, then change its password and to make sure your new ones go in a clean and secure box.

4.6 Change your Google, Yahoo passwords and for any browsers. If they had been compromised, then anything else you did on any parts of their empires could have been. If you store passwords using the browser, the browser has to be safe before you do anything else. So you have to do them first, or anything else you do could be a waste of time.

4.7 Change your email passwords. You won’t remember all your old one so will have to get resets for some and will need your email for that. You need to be sure you’re using fresh passwords for email in case they had been stolen.

4.8 Change your Facebook, chat room any other social networking passwords. Some say they are safe, best be safer still and change them anyway to your new regime.

One by one, log on to every other site you use and change its password. Use a mixture of characters, capitals and lower case, numbers, punctuation marks (if they are allowed). Write the new password down in your little black book if you want, in a way that means something to you but nobody else.

4.9 Relax. You won’t remember all the sites you ever go to. Some, you won’t have been to for months or even years. But when you cleaned your PC, you deleted all those passwords, so at least if they weren’t already stolen, at least they won’t be stolen now. You will still face a small risk if your passwords are known for sites you don’t remember, but it is probably just a small risk, so really not worth worrying too much about.